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Classic three-stringed lyra

CRETAN LYRA INSTRUMENT N6

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CRETAN LYRA

The Cretan lyra (GreekΚρητική λύρα) is a Greek pear-shaped, three-stringed bowed musical instrument, central to the traditional music of Crete and other islands in the Dodecanese and the Aegean Archipelago, in Greece. The Cretan lyra is considered as the most popular surviving form of the medieval Byzantine lyra, an ancestor of most European bowed instruments.

The Cretan lyra is closely related to the bowed Byzantine lyra, the ancestor of many European bowed instruments and of rabāb found in Islamic empires of that time (Baines Anthony, 1992). The 9th-century Persian geographer Ibn Khurradadhbih (d. 911), in his lexicographical discussion of instruments, cited the lyra as a typical instrument of the Byzantines along with the urghun (organ), shilyani (probably a type of harp or lyre) and the salandj (probably abagpipe) (Margaret J. Kartomi, 1990).

There are three major types of Cretan lyras:

  1. the lyraki (Greek: λυράκι), a small model of lyra, almost identical to the Byzantine lyra devoted only to the performance of dances (Anoyanakis, 1976)
  2. the vrontolyra (Greek: βροντόλυρα), which is gives a very strong sound, ideal for accompaniment songs.
  3. the common lyra (Greek: λύρα κοινή), popular in the island today; designed after the combination of lyraki with the violin.

The influence of the violin caused the transformation of many features of the old form of Cretan Lyra (lyraki) into the contemporary lyra, including its tuning, performance practice, and repertory. In 1920, the viololyra was developed in an effort of local instrument manufacturers to give the sound and the technical possibilities of the violin to the old Byzantine lyraki. Twenty years later a new combination of lyraki and violin gave birth to the common lyra. Other types include thefour-stringed lyra.

In 1990, Ross Daly designed a new type of Cretan lyra which incorporates elements of lyraki, the Byzantine lyra and the Indian sarangi. The result was a lyra with three playing strings of 29 cm in length (the same as the standard Cretan lyra), and 18 sympathetic strings which resonate on Indian-styled jawari bridges (the number of sympathetic strings was later increased to 22).

Source: Wikipedia


 




Additional Information

Instrument Type ΤΟΞΟΤΟ
New / Used New
Main Material Wallnut
Neck -
Cap Material Cedar
Case -
Fingerboard Ebony
Pegs A D G
Fabrication Handmade
Maker -

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Description

Details

CRETAN LYRA

The Cretan lyra (GreekΚρητική λύρα) is a Greek pear-shaped, three-stringed bowed musical instrument, central to the traditional music of Crete and other islands in the Dodecanese and the Aegean Archipelago, in Greece. The Cretan lyra is considered as the most popular surviving form of the medieval Byzantine lyra, an ancestor of most European bowed instruments.

The Cretan lyra is closely related to the bowed Byzantine lyra, the ancestor of many European bowed instruments and of rabāb found in Islamic empires of that time (Baines Anthony, 1992). The 9th-century Persian geographer Ibn Khurradadhbih (d. 911), in his lexicographical discussion of instruments, cited the lyra as a typical instrument of the Byzantines along with the urghun (organ), shilyani (probably a type of harp or lyre) and the salandj (probably abagpipe) (Margaret J. Kartomi, 1990).

There are three major types of Cretan lyras:

  1. the lyraki (Greek: λυράκι), a small model of lyra, almost identical to the Byzantine lyra devoted only to the performance of dances (Anoyanakis, 1976)
  2. the vrontolyra (Greek: βροντόλυρα), which is gives a very strong sound, ideal for accompaniment songs.
  3. the common lyra (Greek: λύρα κοινή), popular in the island today; designed after the combination of lyraki with the violin.

The influence of the violin caused the transformation of many features of the old form of Cretan Lyra (lyraki) into the contemporary lyra, including its tuning, performance practice, and repertory. In 1920, the viololyra was developed in an effort of local instrument manufacturers to give the sound and the technical possibilities of the violin to the old Byzantine lyraki. Twenty years later a new combination of lyraki and violin gave birth to the common lyra. Other types include thefour-stringed lyra.

In 1990, Ross Daly designed a new type of Cretan lyra which incorporates elements of lyraki, the Byzantine lyra and the Indian sarangi. The result was a lyra with three playing strings of 29 cm in length (the same as the standard Cretan lyra), and 18 sympathetic strings which resonate on Indian-styled jawari bridges (the number of sympathetic strings was later increased to 22).

Source: Wikipedia


 




Additional

Additional Information

Instrument Type ΤΟΞΟΤΟ
New / Used New
Main Material Wallnut
Neck -
Cap Material Cedar
Case -
Fingerboard Ebony
Pegs A D G
Fabrication Handmade
Maker -

Tags

Product Tags

  • No tags connected to product

Use spaces to separate tags. Use single quotes (') for phrases.

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